Tag Archives: carrots

Roasted Spiced Carrot and Quinoa Salad

<img alt="roasted spicy carrot and quinoa salad"/>

Sometimes when I’m at the market, I come across bags of brightly colored carrots — carrots in a deep burgundy and cheerful yellow nestled with the expected orange.  Once in a while there are a few  very pale yellow carrots in the mix as well, but the burgundies are what I think most striking.  Once sliced the rich, dark tone of the exterior rings the brighter orange in the center.  I can’t resist them when I see them simply because they’re beautiful.

I begin to think about what I might make with them as I add them to my basket, remembering that in past experiences I’ve been disappointed to find that when peeled — especially the dark ones — the beautiful color goes with the peelings.  Or when put into something braised, the color dissipates in the cooking liquid.  Such is the life of someone who not only enjoys food for its flavor and nutritional value (or lack thereof from time to time), but for its innate beauty.  It’s all a bit like taking time to smell the flowers so to speak.  Appreciate the small things in life which are easily unrecognized if — as in the example of these carrots — one always grabs the bag of tiny already peeled baby carrots.

Go ahead.  Call me silly.

No, these beauties were destined for the perfect recipe — one I’d seen in Food & Wine and tagged immediately.   I love quinoa and couldn’t resist the blend of spices in the recipe that would go fabulously with the roasted carrots and some dark, leafy greens.

First, peel the carrots lightly — or maybe you’re someone who just gives them a good scrub with a veggie brush.  I don’t like the bitter taste of the peelings, but maybe it’s my imagination.  I eat peelings on just about everything except carrots.

<img alt="colorful carrots"/>

<img alt="colorful carrots"/>

After you peel the carrots, split them down the center, then quarter them.  Some may need another cut to even the pieces out.

<img alt="spices for roasted carrot salad"/>

This is the part where it pays off to have all the spices on hand a recipe like this calls for.  The aroma is heavenly, and the mix of color so beautiful.

<img alt="colorful spicy carrots and onions"/>

The carrots are tossed in a bit of olive oil and a portion of the blended spices.  Sliced red onions are added to roast at 400 degrees F for about 20 minutes, tossing the mix once or twice during the baking time.

I thought both red and black quinoa would look attractive with the colorful carrots.

<img alt="spiced red and black quinoa"/>

Another portion of the spice blend is mixed in with the quinoa before cooking.

Water is added to the quinoa and spices and cooked until all the liquid has been absorbed.  You’ll have to check it occasionally and stir a bit to make sure it’s cooking steadily.  It will take about 20 minutes at most.

<img alt="roasted spicy carrots"/>

The carrots and onions smell so good when they’re roasting.  When they’re finished, just set them aside to cool down while you finish making the rest of the salad.

<img alt="super greens for salad"/>

I like to buy big packages of a mixture of spinach and baby kale because it comes in so handy for salads or any other way I’d like to use it.  The greens are very tender and packed with so many nutrients your body will thank you for.  I used several large handfuls for this salad.

The greens are tossed first with a bit of lime juice and extra virgin olive oil.  You can season lightly with salt and pepper if you like, but there will be seasoning in the other parts of the salad as well.  I always toss my greens in a bowl separately before I decide whether I’m going to plate the entire salad, or portion them out separately.  It depends…

<img alt="lemon mustard vinaigrette"/>

Then a dressing for the quinoa and other ingredients is made with lime juice, mustard, and some of the remaining spice mix that was used for the carrots and quinoa.

The dressing is added to the cooked quinoa and dried cranberries are mixed in.  Aren’t the colors beautiful?  I love this salad!  Spoon the quinoa mixture over the greens…

<img alt="roasted spicy carrot and quinoa salad"/>

…then layer the spicy roasted carrots over the quinoa.  Toasted walnuts finish the salad.  I’m hungry for it all over again just looking at it!  It’s sweet and spicy, crunchy and refreshing.  I enjoyed mine by myself because the hubster was working late, so I had time to mull over the color and flavor of everything wondering what he’d think when he got home.

<img alt="roasted spicy carrot and quinoa salad"/>

It kept quite nicely at room temperature covered with plastic.  In fact, there was too much for the two of us for dinner, so I was able to enjoy the rest the next day for lunch.  Delicious.

 

Roasted Spiced Carrot and Quinoa Salad
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
This salad is full of aromatic spices and packed with nutrients. It's a perfect meal by itself.
Author:
Recipe type: Salad, Vegan, Gluten-free
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • 2 tsp. smoked paprika
  • 1 tsp. turmeric
  • 1 tsp. ground cumin
  • 1 tsp. ground ginger
  • 1 tsp. ground coriander
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • ½ tsp. cayenne
  • ¼ tsp. ground allspice
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. black pepper
  • 4 lg. carrots, peeled and quartered lengthwise
  • ¼ red onion, sliced thin
  • 7 T. extra virgin olive oil
  • ¼ c. walnuts, toasted
  • ½ c. red quinoa
  • ½ c. black quinoa
  • 2 c. water
  • juice of 1 lime, divided in half
  • 4 c. mixed dark leafy greens
  • 1 tsp. Dijon
  • ½ c. dried cranberries
  • 2 T. chopped cilantro
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Mix the paprika, turmeric, cumin, ginger, coriander, cinnamon, cayenne, and allspice with 1 tsp. of salt, and 1 tsp. of black pepper in a small bowl and whisk to combine them.
  3. Place the carrots and onions on a parchment lined baking sheet and drizzle with 2 T of olive oil, then sprinkle with 1 T of the spice mix. Toss around a bit to coat the vegetables well.
  4. Roast for 15 to 20 minutes, turning once halfway through the cooking time, until tender.
  5. Prepare the quinoa by mixing it with 2 T of the spice mix and the water in a medium sauce pan.
  6. Cover the pan and bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer to continue cooking until all the moisture is absorbed and the quinoa is tender, about 20 minutes.
  7. After the quinoa is started, coarsely chop the walnuts and put them in a skillet in the oven along with the carrots to roast for 5 minutes -- just until golden.
  8. Prepare the greens by adding 2 T of the olive oil and the juice of ½ lime seasoned with a pinch of salt and pepper to a large bowl. Whisk until blended, then add the greens and lightly toss with the lemon and oil mixture.
  9. Divide greens evenly among separate plates, or arrange on a single large platter according to your desire.
  10. In the same large bowl, whisk together the remaining 3 T olive oil, the juice of the remaining ½ lime, Dijon, and 1 T of the spice mix. Add the quinoa and cranberries and toss lightly to combine. Season with salt and pepper.
  11. Spoon the quinoa mixture over the plated greens, then arrange the roasted carrots and onions.
  12. Sprinkle with the toasted walnuts and finish with the chopped cilantro.

 

 Recipe Notes

  • The original recipe by Anna Zepaltas can be found here at Food & Wine.  My changes were primarily to use lime juice instead of lemon, cilantro instead of parsley, allspice instead of cardamom, and to add the black quinoa to the mix.  I like cilantro and lime and thought the combination would be great in this salad.
  • This was a great dinner salad and as much as my husband pretty much eats whatever I prepare — whether it contains meat or not — some nights, he still wants something more.  This was one of those nights.  But it was perfect for me.
  • I think a perfect addition to this salad — or substitution — would be sweet potatoes or butternut squash.  Both would work well with the spices and greens and perhaps be a bit more filling to my husband who will help himself to a bowl of cereal after dinner if he isn’t completely satisfied.
  • You should have some of the spice mixture left over — I think I may try it in some butternut squash soup — but it would taste wonderful on so many different things.

 

 

Carrot Raisin Salad & Getaway to Laguna Beach

 

You thought I was gone, didn’t you?  Gone as in not writing here any longer.  Not posting recipes, or photos, or recording notes of what I’ve made.

I’m sure someone somewhere has deemed such negligence to be a blogging foul and most likely written a post about it listing the “Top Ten Things Not to Do”  in blogging.  But I’m here, not intentionally avoiding writing, but busy with other things and enjoying every minute of it.

It feels exactly like a vacation.

Chalk it up to amazing summer weather — weather that completely makes up for what we didn’t have last year.  Clear skies, warm days, almost no humidity.  Night breezes through open windows with a hint of salt in the air reminding me there’s an ocean not too far away.

Perfect.

I’ve not been lolling about, however.

My oldest niece asked me to make her wedding cake, and since I’ve not made one before, it’s been the excuse du jour to obsess over details — some important, and some not so much.

I’ve continued to behave like a DIY groupie on the patio project with my husband who has finally had time to help with the work.  He mixes cement and I set the stones on the planter tops, making progress more quickly than I’m able to by myself.  Bathroom towel bars have been replaced sans appropriate tools, dust has been wiped from my ancient sewing machine to make drapes for my office of fabric I purchased months and months ago, and boxes of things I saved for a reason I’ve forgotten have been sorted.  At this point, cooking would be far easier.

I have done some cooking, but mostly uninvolved salads or pasta wedged between wedding cake experimentation, forced by lemon cake that wasn’t lemony enough according to taste testers.

Not so perfect.

When I was tired of having my head in the cake world, we’d get sandwiches from our favorite deli on the way to or from the beach after a rare walk, or before watching a not so rare sunset.  We’ve sampled some of San Diego’s food trucks and taken a bit of a staycation, enjoying Southern California  like a tourist might instead of taking it for granted which is something I’ve done for years and years.

Sounds pretty summerish, doesn’t it?

All I need is a hammock, some shade, a beverage and perhaps a bit of this carrot raisin salad I put my own spin on.  It’s light, just slightly sweet, and full of fresh crunchiness.  Perfect for a picnic anywhere you want to relax.

Hope your summer is going well, too.

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Olive Oil Carrot Cake

 

I can’t remember the first time I had carrot cake, but I’m sure it wasn’t until I was well into my adult years.  It’s strange now that I think about it because my mother used to make a mean carrot salad.  The basic ingredients aren’t all that different except for the mayonnaise she’d dollop in the huge bowl of grated carrots and raisins before stirring in some sugar, and I’ll bet I can find more than one recipe for carrot cake that calls for mayo, too.  Mind you, this would be much to the complete horror of my husband who steers clear of anything that suggests mayo is an ingredient.

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Salad a la Bittman: No. 14

Bittman No. 14

 

I’ve always been someone who enjoys a great salad, so it should be no surprise that I’ve become quite comfortable working my way through Mark Bittman’s 101 Simple Salads for the Season.  The 12-page print out is showing signs of wear with jottings of ingredients I’ve added, dates I prepared each that I’ve made, and stars to denote the direction I may next take.  Oh, the possibilities.  Of course, that would depend on the condition of the veggies I purchased when my eyes were bigger than my ability to follow through in an organized manner.

Let’s face it —  mushrooms only last so long if one doesn’t push the idea that they prefer the open air to being wrapped in a plastic bag in the fridge.  Or consider the Jerusalem artichokes that met an untimely demise because I  didn’t have one of the ingredients I needed to make Salad No. 5.  And then there was the jicama that had seen better days long before I cut into it, surprised that it’s possible to find jicama in San Diego in that condition.  Perhaps salad No. 9 wasn’t meant to be on that particular day.

Honestly, I’ve grown to enjoy “The List” as it promises so much as long as I’m prepared, and goodness knows when it comes to food, I’m usually prepared.  The salads are so easily made and adapted that reviewing a section prepares you for the shopping and if the ingredients are remotely connected to what Bittman suggests, then I say fair game and a salad is born.

This past Sunday, I enjoyed salads No. 14 and 26 respectively; one for lunch and the other shared for dinner with grilled beef.  Each was so different, yet delicious, and that is what has kept me interested.   You just never know when you may find the opportunity to pair fennel and prune plums again in your lifetime, right?

Bear with me as I continue this exploration of textures and flavors — baked goodies will always be on the horizon.

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